A Principled Approach to Legal Tech

[A previous version of this article appeared in Legal Business World and ILTA's Peer to Peer Magazine] “Ironically, the popular business press, focused on hot, emerging industries, is prone to presenting these special cases as proof that we have entered a new era of competition in which none of the old rules are valid. In … Continue reading A Principled Approach to Legal Tech

Are Law Firms as Profitable as They Could Be?

It is pretty clear that, in the past, lawyers did a great job disrupting themselves. The term “disruption” comes from Clayton Christensen’s observation that the ability of a company to make a higher and higher performing product always outstrips the ability of customers to make use of these performance improvements. As technology pushes a product’s performance … Continue reading Are Law Firms as Profitable as They Could Be?

A detailed comparison of technology adopter types

Everett Rogers developed the now-standard framework for how an innovation diffuses throughout society. Geoffrey Moore went into greater detail on the adopter types. I understood conceptually that these various groups are based on certain differences, but it wasn't until I mapped these out (based on Moores book) that I realized how distinct these groups really … Continue reading A detailed comparison of technology adopter types

Principle #5: Own your customer’s success

Note: for the full essay click here. Recall Principle #1: people do not like to feel “owned” or told what to do. But they do like to be “owned” if what that means is a vendor (or change agent) taking ongoing responsibility for the success of their joint ventures. Especially with newer products, there is … Continue reading Principle #5: Own your customer’s success

Principle #4: Until you break into the mainstream, focus your efforts on a single user group

Note: for the full essay click here. From Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Gregg McKeown Despite the number of times he repeats the importance of focus in his materials, the number one question Geoffrey Moore gets about crossing the chasm is Can’t we go after more than one target? His answer is unequivocal: “Just … Continue reading Principle #4: Until you break into the mainstream, focus your efforts on a single user group